Tag Archives: photos

How to easily display your Instagram photos online

Instagram is a weird little iPhone app. On one hand, it makes it very easy to take and share very cool looking images with your iphone, as long as you’re sharing them with other Instagram users.

On the other hand, it’s kinda difficult to show those images to others in a simple web interface — or link to them in email, a web page, a tweet or a facebook status update.

Until now.
Instagrid.me is one of the first apps to use the new Instagram API to package  your images in a nice, clean and friendly display.

Simply hit the website, authenticate your Twitter credentials, and you have generated the gallery — here’s mine: instagrid.me/bgrier

Simple wins.

Fast and free Photoshop Express app gets an update

PSx.jpg

I’m a big fan of Adobe’s Photoshop Express as an online service.

Basically it’s a free online image organizer / storage box and a collection of robust image editing tools (Similar to Flickr and Picasa).

But where Adobe’s tried to differentiate Photoshop Express from the competition is by also releasing a free and powerful Photoshop Express iOS image capture and editing app that ties into the Photoshop Express online service.

Image 2011316123917.jpgAnd now with this latest update, there’s more focus (sorry) on the camera workflow side of things, which includes an in-app purchase of the Adobe Camera Pack:

  • New Camera workflow for rapid in-app photo-taking
  • In-App Purchase of Adobe Camera Pack: Reduce Noise, Self Timer, and Auto Review
  • Full Retina Display Support
  • Multi-Tasking Support

Nice to see some of these features bundled in, and optional — buy ’em if you need ’em — otherwise you’ve still got access to a good set of image capture, editing and sharing tools, for free.
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How did National Geographic get those great shots?

I’ve always been a fan of National Geographic’s photography — and how could you not be? The National Geographic Society photographers have produced some of the best images of the last century.

And now, you can learn how National Geographic photographers get their shots with a new photo-magazine app, 50 Greatest Photographs of National Geographic.

Some of the more interesting features of the app include:

  • Learn the stories behind these iconic photographs from the photographers themselves, and see videos explaining how they captured their shots.
  • See the sequence of images made by the photographers in the field, and find out just how the “perfect shot” happened.
  • Share National Geographic’s 50 Greatest Photographs with your friends through email and Facebook.
  • Connect with National Geographic magazine’s community by viewing our top user-submitted photographs or submitting your best photographs.
  • National Geographic magazine attracts the world’s finest photographers. Here is your chance to learn more about them.

Well worth the addition to your iPad Darkroom library. Obviously, this app excels on the larger display of the iPad — it’s not available for iPod Touch or iPhone.
In the App Store – $4.99.

iPad2 Announced. More Power.

Though it appears that the screen resolution of our favourite iOS device won’t change, the horsepower behind the screen sure will.

According to the images presented by Steve Jobs in today’s iPad2 announcement, the unit will feature:

  • Dual-core processors
  • Up to 2x faster CPU
  • Up to 9x faster graphics
  • New A5 chip
  • Same low power as A4 chip
  • First dual core tablet to ship in volume

As well, it’ll be thinner, lighter, and available in white. Oh, and it has cameras. 2 of them. No excuse for missing that shot if you have your iPad2 with you then.

What this means for many iPad Darkroom apps and users is that whatever apps you use in your digital darkroom, expect them to get enhancements soon to take advantage of the new horsepower in the new hardware. Not sure how this will impact upgraded apps on iPad1 hardware. Time will tell.

 

 

 

Digital Images – Digital Darkroom – Part two

Earlier this week I started this series by looking at my digital photography workflow as applied to image acquisition (taking the picture). Today I’m going to look at what I do with the image in my mobile photo studio, my iPad Darkroom, if you will.

I’ve got the image, now what?
Taking the photo is just the starting point. Once you have a neat image, you can easily make it stronger by carefully applying modern digital darkroom techniques.

In my case, I shoot on a Digital SLR (Panasonic Lumix FZ-30), or a Canon Powershot Point-and-shoot.

On the FZ-30, I shoot RAW+jpg, which potentially gives me the most digital information to work with in the digital darkroom. The Canon gives me .jpg so I have to take what I can get.

I say potentially because currently, only a few apps support (or are planning to support) RAW. Editing a .jpg is adequate, but not optimal.
Continue reading Digital Images – Digital Darkroom – Part two