Category Archives: How To

Always carry your camera

Always carry your camera - ShootTokyo

Advice from a great:

His point is a great one.  If you are only shoot­ing when you plan to shoot you end up bring far too much stuff with you.  You end up bring­ing a cou­ple of extra lens­es, maybe you should include a flash, what about a tri­pod, etc.   By the time you are done you have way too much gear.  Don’t mak­ing tak­ing pho­tos too hard.  Always car­ry your cam­era with you and shoot what is in front of you.

via Always car­ry your cam­era — Shoot­Tokyo.

Waterlogued makes art from your art

Water­logue is a very cool iPad / iPhone app that basi­cal­ly a water­colour fil­ter for your images. And it works very very nice­ly!

I crawled through my image archive and grabbed a few good shots, and some OK shots, and I real­ly like the way they turned out.

As well, I thought I’d just try tak­ing a pic­ture of the floor, and even it looked bet­ter.

I can see that I’ll be using Water­logue more often in my images… not so much as a final fil­ter but rather as one ele­ment I can apply as I fine-tune the shot. Anoth­er tool in the dig­i­tal cam­era bag.

Curent­ly Water­logue is $2.99 in the App Store.

How to easily display your Instagram photos online

Insta­gram is a weird lit­tle iPhone app. On one hand, it makes it very easy to take and share very cool look­ing images with your iphone, as long as you’re shar­ing them with oth­er Insta­gram users.

On the oth­er hand, it’s kin­da dif­fi­cult to show those images to oth­ers in a sim­ple web inter­face — or link to them in email, a web page, a tweet or a face­book sta­tus update.

Until now.
Instagrid.me is one of the first apps to use the new Insta­gram API to pack­age  your images in a nice, clean and friend­ly dis­play.

Sim­ply hit the web­site, authen­ti­cate your Twit­ter cre­den­tials, and you have gen­er­at­ed the gallery — here’s mine: instagrid.me/bgrier

Sim­ple wins.

Learn how to make the light work for you

One thing about being into pho­tog­ra­phy; you quick­ly real­ize that there’s a lot to learn from oth­er pho­tog­ra­phers.

A sub­ject that’s always chal­lenged me has been the con­cept of mak­ing light work for me rather than forc­ing me to adapt to the demands of the light sources.

Learn­ing from oth­er pho­tog­ra­phers through their light­ing dia­grams has helped me bet­ter under­stand how a par­tic­u­lar tool (reflec­tor, barn doors, snoot, etc) should be used to get a spe­cif­ic result.

And recent­ly, I found some things that let me work through the think­ing exer­cise need­ed to cre­ate bet­ter-lit images.
Con­tin­ue read­ing Learn how to make the light work for you