Category Archives: How To

Always carry your camera

Always carry your camera - ShootTokyo

Advice from a great:

His point is a great one.  If you are only shooting when you plan to shoot you end up bring far too much stuff with you.  You end up bringing a couple of extra lenses, maybe you should include a flash, what about a tripod, etc.   By the time you are done you have way too much gear.  Don’t making taking photos too hard.  Always carry your camera with you and shoot what is in front of you.

via Always carry your camera – ShootTokyo.

Waterlogued makes art from your art

Waterlogue is a very cool iPad / iPhone app that basically a watercolour filter for your images. And it works very very nicely!

I crawled through my image archive and grabbed a few good shots, and some OK shots, and I really like the way they turned out.

As well, I thought I’d just try taking a picture of the floor, and even it looked better.

I can see that I’ll be using Waterlogue more often in my images… not so much as a final filter but rather as one element I can apply as I fine-tune the shot. Another tool in the digital camera bag.

Curently Waterlogue is $2.99 in the App Store.

How to easily display your Instagram photos online

Instagram is a weird little iPhone app. On one hand, it makes it very easy to take and share very cool looking images with your iphone, as long as you’re sharing them with other Instagram users.

On the other hand, it’s kinda difficult to show those images to others in a simple web interface — or link to them in email, a web page, a tweet or a facebook status update.

Until now.
Instagrid.me is one of the first apps to use the new Instagram API to package  your images in a nice, clean and friendly display.

Simply hit the website, authenticate your Twitter credentials, and you have generated the gallery — here’s mine: instagrid.me/bgrier

Simple wins.

Learn how to make the light work for you

One thing about being into photography; you quickly realize that there’s a lot to learn from other photographers.

A subject that’s always challenged me has been the concept of making light work for me rather than forcing me to adapt to the demands of the light sources.

Learning from other photographers through their lighting diagrams has helped me better understand how a particular tool (reflector, barn doors, snoot, etc) should be used to get a specific result.

And recently, I found some things that let me work through the thinking exercise needed to create better-lit images.
Continue reading Learn how to make the light work for you